Media Appearances

NASA Coverage for Parker Solar Probe

Pre-launch Science Briefing for Parker Solar Probe Early on an August morning, the sky near Cape Canaveral, Florida, will light up with the launch of Parker Solar Probe. No earlier than Aug. 6, 2018, a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy will thunder to space carrying the car-sized spacecraft, which will study the Sun closer than any human-made object ever has.

On July 20, 2018, Nicky Fox, Parker Solar Probe’s project scientist at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab in Laurel, Maryland, and Alex Young, associate director for science in the Heliophysics Science Division at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, introduced Parker Solar Probe’s science goals and the technology behind them at a televised press conference from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida.

“We’ve been studying the Sun for decades, and now we’re finally going to go where the action is,” said Young.

CREDIT: NASA, Music by Kevin Macleod

In the Kennedy Space Center’s Press Site auditorium, on Friday, July 20, 2018, agency and mission leaders speak to members of the media during a prelaunch briefing for the Parker Solar Probe mission. From left are: Betsy Congdon, Thermal Protection System engineer with Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, Alex Young, solar scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, Nicky Fox, project scientist with the Johns Hopkins University APL, and Karen Fox of NASA Communications. The Parker Solar Probe will lift off on a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The spacecraft was built by Applied Physics Laboratory of Johns Hopkins University in Laurel in Maryland. The mission will perform the closest-ever observations of a star when it travels through the Sun's atmosphere, called the corona. The probe will rely on measurements and imaging to revolutionize understanding of the corona and the Sun-Earth connection. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux
In the Kennedy Space Center’s Press Site auditorium, on Friday, July 20, 2018, agency and mission leaders speak to members of the media during a prelaunch briefing for the Parker Solar Probe mission. From left are: Betsy Congdon, Thermal Protection System engineer with Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, Alex Young, solar scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, Nicky Fox, project scientist with the Johns Hopkins University APL, and Karen Fox of NASA Communications. The Parker Solar Probe will lift off on a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The spacecraft was built by Applied Physics Laboratory of Johns Hopkins University in Laurel in Maryland. The mission will perform the closest-ever observations of a star when it travels through the Sun's atmosphere, called the corona. The probe will rely on measurements and imaging to revolutionize understanding of the corona and the Sun-Earth connection. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux

NASA TV Coverage of the Total Solar Eclipse

NASA TV presented four hours of coverage of the August 21, 2017, total solar eclipse as it crosses the continental United States. It was the first such eclipse in 99 years and the first total solar eclipse visible in any part of the U.S. since 1979. C. Alex Young was one of the co-hosts.

C. Alex Young on the NASA TV Coverage of the Total Solar Eclipse, August 21, 2017 CREDIT: NASA & C-SPAN
C. Alex Young on the NASA TV Coverage of the Total Solar Eclipse, August 21, 2017 CREDIT: NASA & C-SPAN

TV Interviews for NASA

Scientist and citizens alike are preparing for August 21 when a total solar eclipse will cross North America for the first time in 99 years. The rare event will start in Oregon and take less than two hours to reach South Carolina. Adriana Diaz reports. CREDITS: CBS This Morning

CREDITS: SOHO, SDO, WJZ CBS Baltimore

Live TV Interviews for NASA

CREDITS: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA Live Broadcasts

CREDITS: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA Astrophysicist C. Alex Young talks with Leo Laporte and Iain Thomson about solar flares and other space weather that could negatively affect electronics here on Earth. They discuss how NASA is monitoring this weather and what we should do in the worst case scenario. Watch the full episode here.

TWiT.tv is a technology podcasting network located in the San Francisco Bay Area with the #1 ranked technology podcast This Week in Tech hosted by Leo Laporte. Every week we produce over 30 hours of content on a variety of programs including Tech News Today, The New Screen Savers, MacBreak Weekly, This Week in Google, Windows Weekly, Security Now, All About Android, and more.

CREDIT: TWiT.tv

CREDITS: National Science Foundation

NASA Promos

CREDITS: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

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