Archive for Annular

A Rare Treat from the Sun, Earth and Moon – A Hybrid Eclipse

There will be a hybrid solar eclipse on Sunday November 3, 2013. This rare occurrence of an annular and total eclipse is the final eclipse event of 2013.

When the Moon passes directly between the Sun and Earth, its umbra (shadow cone) reaches Earth's surface and thus completely covers the Sun. The result is a total solar eclipse. But when the Moon is slightly farther from Earth, its disk appears to small to block the entire Sun, and an annular (or ring) eclipse results. credit: Sky & Telescope

When the Moon passes directly between the Sun and Earth, its umbra (shadow cone) reaches Earth’s surface and thus completely covers the Sun. The result is a total solar eclipse. But when the Moon is slightly farther from Earth, its disk appears to small to block the entire Sun, and an annular (or ring) eclipse results. credit: Sky & Telescope

Never look at the sun or an eclipse directly! 

Eye safety during solar eclipses

What do the different types of eclipses look like?

Annular eclipse by Hiroki Ono.

Annular eclipse by Hiroki Ono.

credit: NASA/GSFC/ Fred Espenak

credit: NASA/GSFC/ Fred Espenak

Photo of partial solar eclipse as seen near sunset on May 20, 2012, from Austin, Texas. This time around, eastern North America will see a partial solar eclipse just after sunrise on November 3, 2013. Image credit: mrlaugh’s photostream

Photo of partial solar eclipse as seen near sunset on May 20, 2012, from Austin, Texas. This time around, eastern North America will see a partial solar eclipse just after sunrise on November 3, 2013. credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mrlaugh/7239061514/

Where can you see it?

Map of the Hybrid Eclipse Path

The eclipse on November 3, 2013, begins as an annular event (far-left end of green line) but quickly becomes a total solar eclipse as the moon’s umbra crosses the Atlantic Ocean and central Africa. credit:
Sky & Telescope illustration / source: F. Espenak

The hybrid eclipse starts as an annular eclipse at a point in the Atlantic Ocean about 600 miles (1,000 km) east of Florida, USA. A lucky observer will have a brief glimpse of an annular or ring of fire eclipse a few seconds after sunrise. Then the eclipse becomes a total eclipse. The longest period of totality, 99.5 seconds, occurs at about 12:46 UT at a point around 200 miles (330 km) southwest of the Liberian coast. The path of the total eclipse continue across the Atlantic to Africa. It reached land in Gabon. Then it travels east-northeastward through Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda and northern Kenya. It ends in southern Ethiopia and westernmost Somalia at sunset.

Animation of 2013 November 3 solar eclipse. The large gray circle shows the area of the partial solar eclipse. The very small dark dot in the middle depicts the path of the total solar eclipse.

Animation of 2013 November 3 solar eclipse. The large gray circle shows the area of the partial solar eclipse. The very small dark dot in the middle depicts the path of the total solar eclipse.

 The partial eclipse will be visible from far-eastern North America, the Caribbean, northern South America, southern Greenland, the Atlantic Ocean, southern Europe, Africa, Madagascar and the Middle East.

Eclipse prospects for the US East Coast. (credit: Michael Zeiler @EclipseMaps)

Eclipse prospects for the US East Coast. (credit: Michael Zeiler @EclipseMaps)

Weather permitting, early risers along the Eastern Seaboard can see a partial solar eclipse at sunrise on November 3, 2013. Percentages show fraction of Sun's area covered by the Moon. Sky & Telescope illustration / source: Stellarium

The Eastern Seaboard can see a partial solar eclipse at sunrise on November 3, 2013. Percentages show fraction of Sun’s area covered by the Moon. credit:
Sky & Telescope illustration / source: Stellarium

When can you see it?

(Converting UT or Universal Time to your local time)

Eclipse times (courtesy Earth Sky):

NOTE: This eclipse happens early on Sunday, according to U.S. clocks! For those in the U.S., Daylight Saving Time ends November 3 at 2 a.m. local time on your clock. Remember to fall back and set your clocks back by one hour.

Canada:

Montreal, Quebec
Sunrise: 6:35 a.m. EST
Partial eclipse ends: 7:12 a.m. EST

United States:

New York City, NY
Sunrise: 6:29 a.m. EST
Partial eclipse ends: 7:11 a.m. EST

Raleigh, North Carolina
Sunrise: 6:39 a.m. EST
Partial eclipse ends: 7:08 a.m. EST

Miami, Florida
Sunrise: 6:31 a.m. EST
Partial eclipse ends: 7:02 a.m. EST

Caribbean:

Havana, Cuba
Sunrise: 6:34 a.m. EST
Partial eclipse ends: 7:00 a.m. EST

South America:

Cartagena, Colombia
Sunrise: 5:52 a.m. local time
Partial eclipse ends: 6:52 a.m. local time

Europe, Africa and the Middle East see solar eclipse in afternoon hours November 3.The western portions of Europe and Africa will see the greatest eclipse around noon or early afternoon. For far-eastern Africa, Madagascar and the Middle East, the eclipse will take place in the late afternoon or close to sunset. Remember to use eye protection!

Local eclipse times:

Madrid, Spain
Partial eclipse begins: 1:00 p.m. local time
Greatest eclipse: 1:35 p.m. local time
Partial eclipse ends: 2:10 p.m. local time

Algiers, Algeria
Partial eclipse begins: 1:15 p.m. local time
Greatest eclipse: 1:56 p.m. local time
Partial eclipse ends: 2:36 p.m. local time

Jerusalem, Israel
Partial eclipse begins: 3:12 p.m. local time
Greatest eclipse: 4:00 p.m. local time
Partial eclipse ends: 4:43 p.m. local time

Can you still enjoy it even if you can’t observe it in person?

There will be a lot of great imagery and video afterwards but you can still follow the eclipse online even if you can see it in person with Slooh Community Observatory. Online coverage begins at 1045 UTC (6:45 a.m. EST) on November 3.

Other resources and references:

Earth Sky

Eclipse at NASA

Eclipse Maps

US Naval Observatory Eclipse Computer

timeanddate.com Eclipse Calculator

05.20.12 – “Ring of Fire” Solar Eclipse

The first annular eclipse visible from the contiguous United States in almost 18 years

During the annular eclipse the Moon will travel in front of the Sun blocking most of its light—except for what looks like a ‘Ring of Fire’ around the Moon’s edge.

 

A solar eclipse is when the Moon lines up between Earth and the Sun such that the Moon either partially or completely blocks out the Sun. When the Sun is completely blocked out we called it a total solar eclipse, and often this is what people think of with an eclipse. But a partial eclipse can be just as exciting. When the Moon comes just shy of completely blocking out the Sun a bright ring or annulus is visible. This is a special kind of partial eclipse, an annular eclipse.

The annular eclipse of May 20, 2012 is the first annular eclipse visible from the contiguous United States in almost 18 years. The eclipse will be visible in a narrow path with the Moon’s shadow traveling across the Northern Hemisphere. The shadow begins in East Asia, crossing the Pacific Ocean and end in the western United States. Those in the US can observe the eclipse starting in the late afternoon local time. Those in the Eastern-most viewing area in Lubbock, Texas will see the eclipse right at sunset, which should create incredible opportunities for photographers.

The Sun Today has created this mini guide to viewing, and we’ll be posting our favorite images if you miss it live. If you are lucky enough to see it in-person, please share your image on our Facebook Page or email them to me at alex@thesuntoday.org with your credits and I’ll share to our community.

When to see the Eclipse on Sunday, May 20, 2012

Watch the Eclipse live online

Where to see the Eclipse in-person

ShadowandSubstance.com has created an Animated Eclipse Map that shows what it will look like from various locations.

How to Safely Watch the Eclipse

Guide to Solar Eclipses (Infographic)

Credit: Karl Tate, SPACE.com Contributor – How Solar Eclipses Work: When the moon covers up the sun, skywatchers delight in the opportunity to see a rare spectacle.

Guide to Solar Eclipses (Infographic)  Guide to Solar Eclipses (Infographic)